A Case For a “Pets Medical Bill Of Rights”

Akron, Ohio police said that Brandi A. Tomko, a 35-year-old previously-convicted heroin addict, is accused of treating pets at the C&D Animal Hospital on 1474 Brittain Road, in Akron, even though she had no formal veterinary training and did not hold a license to practice veterinary medicine. The police said that Tomko drew blood, wrote prescriptions for animals and performed surgeries, including spaying cats and neutering at least one dog. According to Akron police detective Steve Null, “One cat was put down after Tomko attempted to declaw the animal.”

Tomko was arraigned on a 33-count criminal court indictment. Of these counts, 17 were for alleged felonies, and 16 were for alleged misdemeanors. Included were numerous charges of cruelty to animals, injuring animals, identity fraud and practicing veterinary medicine without a license. She caused a lot of needless pain and one death we know of.

I find it distressing that the owner of the veterinary hospital, presumably a state-licensed veterinarian, was not subjected to a criminal indictment for putting Ms. Tomko in charge of the veterinary hospital during his (or her) absence. It makes no sense at all. Should the owner be allowed to get away with criminally facilitating an employee to illegally represent herself as a veterinarian? It is my opinion that the person who put Ms. Tomko in charge of the animal hospital was an accessory to each and every one of the crimes committed by Ms. Tomko.

For more information on this story, go to:
http://fox8.com/2012/04/03/woman-accused-of-killing-pets-while-pretending-to-be-vet/

Akron, Ohio police said that Brandi A. Tomko, a 35-year-old previously-convicted heroin addict, is accused of treating pets at the C&D Animal Hospital on 1474 Brittain Road, in Akron, even though she had no formal veterinary training and did not hold a license to practice veterinary medicine. The police said that Tomko drew blood, wrote prescriptions for animals and performed surgeries, including spaying cats and neutering at least one dog. According to Akron police detective Steve Null, “One cat was put down after Tomko attempted to declaw the animal.”

Tomko was arraigned on a 33-count criminal court indictment. Of these counts, 17 were for alleged felonies, and 16 were for alleged misdemeanors. Included were numerous charges of cruelty to animals, injuring animals, identity fraud and practicing veterinary medicine without a license. She caused a lot of needless pain and one death we know of.

I find it distressing that the owner of the veterinary hospital, presumably a state-licensed veterinarian, was not subjected to a criminal indictment for putting Ms. Tomko in charge of the veterinary hospital during his (or her) absence. It makes no sense at all. Should the owner be allowed to get away with criminally facilitating an employee to illegally represent herself as a veterinarian? It is my opinion that the person who put Ms. Tomko in charge of the animal hospital was an accessory to each and every one of the crimes committed by Ms. Tomko.

For more information on this story, go to:
http://fox8.com/2012/04/03/woman-accused-of-killing-pets-while-pretending-to-be-vet/

The salaries that these so-called “professionals” make is high enough to attract the employees:

  • Who have no formal education;
  • Who have no particular fondness for animals;
  • Who enjoy harming pets; and
  • Who may have a drug addiction.

This statement may come across as extreme, but I can attest that I have met several so-called professionals who have exhibited one or more of these characteristics. They did not even try to hide the fact from me. Once I had a vet say to me “I don’t particularly like pets.” Needless to say I left this person’s office and I complained to the management of the practice. All four of the characteristics listed above appear to apply to Ms. Tomko.

Learn to fire bad doctors and to find good ones. You must be vigilant in order to ensure that your doctor is up-to-standard, and that the hospital adheres to quality care standards. Be sure that you fully understand all of the risks, potential benefits and likely consequences of every decision you make. Question everything and always speak up about everything. There are sometimes unintended consequences when someone blindly puts their “trust” in their doctor. Even the best doctors can make a mistake, but the really dedicated and smart ones set up checks and balances to try to prevent the mistakes from being deadly.

The fact that these situations do occur should make it clear to everybody who loves their companion that there is an urgent need for passage of a “Pets Bill of Rights,” and that we must do all we can to fight for its immediate passage.

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